KIDS AND CAVITIES: THE SECRET TO
YOUR CHILD'S ORAL HEALTH

A child's smile is one of the world's greatest blessings. As parents, we want nothing but the best for our kids, especially on issues concerning their health and well-being. Many parents are having a difficult time judging the type of dental care (and how much of it) their child needs. Others are left around wondering when is the best time they start arranging dental appointments for their kids. To answer all your questions, this article will discuss the secret to how your child can achieve healthy, cavity-free and strong teeth.

There is no need to wait until the child develops a single tooth to establish oral health routines. Oral hygiene can start right away! Did you know that your child's teeth actually begin to form in the second trimester of pregnancy? At birth, your baby has 20 primary teeth, some of which are fully developed in the jaw. So let's get started and save your child from tooth decay using these steps:

Oral care before teething

Start your infant's oral hygiene by gently cleaning the gums, after each feeding, using a water-soaked gauze or damp washcloth.

Get an early checkup

As early as 1 year old, bring your child to the pediatric dentist for preventive care and other useful steps to guarantee healthy teeth and gums

Brushing for infants

When your baby's teeth start to appear, gently brush at least twice a day using an infant toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. Make sure to put a tiny amount (the size of a grain).

Flossing the right way

When your child's teeth start to touch each other, start flossing gently in between teeth.

Brushing everyday

When your child reaches 3, demonstrate the proper ways to teeth brushing using no more than pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste.

Fight baby bottle decay

Do not put your child down for a nap or sleep with a pacifier or a bottle containing milk or juice. When teeth are exposed to sugar-containing liquids, the risk for decay increases relatively.

Control the sugar

Sugary drinks and snacks increase the chances for tooth decay. Limit the amount of sugar you give to your kids.

Talk to the dentist

Ask your dentist about additional healthy practices to improve your child's oral health.

It is always best to start the foundations of oral health as early as possible. It saves you time, effort and money if preventive measures are considered in the beginning. More than anything else, be a good example to your children when it comes to oral hygiene. Remember, kids look up to the doings of the adults around the house. The secret to their healthy teeth and gums depends on us!